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Category: Natural Greenkeeping

Compost Teas

Compost Tea Quick Start Guide

Compost Tea is a home made spray that is applied to fine turf to increase the micro life in the soil. It reintroduces missing microbes and boosts the populations of all of the main beneficial microbe groups such as bacteria, protozoa and the all important Fungi. Some of these help to degrade thatch, turning it into valuable humus, giving life and body to the depleted and often excessively sandy soil in many bowling greens.

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The sweet spot

The Sweet Spot

The Sweet Spot in greenkeeping is when your green's Physical, Chemical and Biological components come into line to deliver results you couldn't previously have imagined were possible. Hitting that sweet spot is a lot simpler than you might imagine too, as focus on the soil's biology will naturally correct some of the worst Chemical problems and compensate for some of the worst Physical ones. There should be no problem "selling" this idea to your club either as first of all it saves money and secondly it massively improves green performance and consistency.

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Healthy soil = healthy turf = healthy soil

A beautifully made film that explains how our turf grasses can interact with soil bacteria and fungi to build the perfect, disease free bowling green eco-system if only we’d let them.

So how can you make 2018 the year you finally make a start on this process at your green?

  1. Become a Free Member of Bowls Central here
  2. Take advantage of the offer I’ll send you when you join to have your soil analysis and report written specifically for your green.
  3. Start following the program I will detail for you and allow me to guide you through the process.

What will the results look like?

  1. Your green will improve in surface performance (faster, smoother and truer) year after year .
  2. Your green keeping costs will reduce.
  3. Your green will behave more consistently and problems like disease, moss and dry patch will disappear.

Watch the video then start the process here.

Other articles related to this:

The Circle of Decline

Compost Tea, what is it and what can it do for your green?

Managing Turf Disease

Poa annua to fine grass transition

 

Fungi

The Role of Microorganisms in Soil Health

The Role of Microorganisms in Soil Health is vast and in many cases misunderstood. For decades we have been obsessed with the potential harm that just a few pathogenic microbes can cause, instead of learning to think of the soil as an eco-system. We've learned the hard way about that approach and now that pesticide availability is being reduced we need to start taking this seriously. Excellent article here from Christopher Johns, Research Manager, Northern Australia and Land Care Research Programme

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A note on the ecology of greens (and squirrels)

A note on the ecology of greens (and squirrels)

Understanding that the ecology of greens exists and what that means is more important for greenkeepers than understanding how that ecology works or indeed any of the scientific components of ecology in isolation. Stepping back and letting nature do its stuff can yield remarkable results.
In this article you'll discover how some commonly applied greenkeeping techniques are actually rather blunt instruments that can result in more harm than good. Top-dressing, applying lawn sand and fungicides are routinely applied to greens in an effort to treat the symptoms of common problems in the soil.

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Compost Teas

Compost Tea Fundamentals

One of the most often asked questions about compost tea goes like this:

"Why can't I just use the compost from the Garden Centre to make compost tea for my greens?"

This is usually mistakenly based around the belief that buying specially inoculated compost will be an expensive business in the long term.

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managing turf disease

Managing turf disease effectively, cheaply and permanently

Managing turf disease effectively, cheaply and permanently is well within the grasp of every greenkeeper. The soil in our greens already holds all of the answers to this, or at least it should do. Some of the routine work we do on greens is more damaging than beneficial. The need to manage turf disease more effectively gives us the perfect excuse to start returning our soils and grass plants to their natural disease resistant selves, much to the benefit of our members and clubs. John explains how to manage turf disease outbreaks simply and with reference to vegetarian sausages :-)...may contain nuts!

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Greenkeeper's nous and bowls green performance

World Soil Day and Natural Greenkeeping

Today is World Soil Day (WSD). A campaign that aims to connect people with soils and raise awareness on their critical importance in our lives.

To mark the occasion The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations has produced a wonderful series of Postcards that highlight the main threats to world soil health. In the UK we don’t do particularly well with many of them.

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